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Walking Humbly: Personal Decisions
Walking Humbly: Personal Decisions
Shira Hecht-Koller, Celene Ibrahim, Jon Kelsen, and Aviva Richman will offer personal reflections about their own choices in relation to the call to walk humbly.
Tzeniut: The Missing Discourse of Modesty
Tzeniut: The Missing Discourse of Modesty
Tova Hartman presents a critique of the ways in which tzeniut is often deployed in our communities and a challenge to reclaim a broader vision of tzeniut.
Cultivating Holiness: Insights and Challenges from the Chassidic Tradition
Cultivating Holiness: Insights and Challenges from the Chassidic Tradition
Through study of selected Chassidic texts, we will explore the contemporary relevance of several models of sacred living found in the writings of Chassidic masters, with an eye to conceptions of holy time and space and the ways in which the sacred is expressed through human deeds.
The Place of Holiness in Contemporary Jewish Life
The Place of Holiness in Contemporary Jewish Life
Join two of our community’s foremost teachers of Torah as they discuss the place of holiness in contemporary Jewish life and how they seek to make room for holiness in their teaching and in their work.
Rediscovering Centers of Holiness and the Sacred
Rediscovering Centers of Holiness and the Sacred
Modern society seems to have lost the conception and experience of holiness, or at least to have reduced them to sociology, psychology, ethics or an amorphous sense of spirituality. We will address the possibility of recapturing a distinct, independent, and religious sense of kedusha and suggest ways in which this sense of holiness might be rediscovered in a variety of important aspects of ordinary life.
Why Rain Comes from Above: Biblical and Rabbinic Reflections on Sharing Our Blessings
Why Rain Comes from Above: Biblical and Rabbinic Reflections on Sharing Our Blessings
Biblical and rabbinic texts about rain invite us to join in an exercise of religious imagination and to consider how this mundane—yet critically life-giving—event offers a model for reflecting on our responsibilities toward those who have less that we do. We will study several of these texts as a foundation for the work of learning about hunger and considering how we might respond.
Re-Imagining the Work of Ending Hunger
Re-Imagining the Work of Ending Hunger
If we are to engage effectively in the work of ending hunger in our communities, then we must do more than collect cans for our local emergency food center. There are many organizations and programs that are paving the way with a new vision for how to end hunger in the United States.  Lisanne and Pam will share the story of what one organization, Elijah’s Promise, is doing in central New Jersey, and offer suggestions for ways to become engaged in the work of building a healthy, just, sustainable food system, where all have access to good food.
Good Food for All: A Dream Deferred
Good Food for All: A Dream Deferred
Since the discovery of domestic hunger in the 1960s, the Unites States has spent trillions of dollars in an attempt to end it. However, with 15 percent of the population food insecure, 47 million people receiving SNAP benefits, and demand at food banks growing steadily, the results are not encouraging. Mark Winne will review the history, programs, policies, and assumptions behind the long battle to end hunger, and explore why that war has reached a stalemate.
Navigating the Sea of Talmud: Study, Teaching, and Personal Religious Meaning
Navigating the Sea of Talmud: Study, Teaching, and Personal Religious Meaning
Three master teachers of Talmud- Dr. Alyssa Gray, Rabbi Dov Linzer, and Rabbi Ethan Tucker- will discuss their approaches to Talmud study and talk about how Talmud study is meaningful to them.
The ‘Conceptual’ Approach to Talmud Study: Where Has It Been, Where Is It Going, and Why Does It Matter?
The ‘Conceptual’ Approach to Talmud Study: Where Has It Been, Where Is It Going, and Why Does It Matter?
The Yeshiva movement assumes that learning Gemara is the central spiritual practice of Judaism. But why does delving into the specifics of property rights, torts, or even the intricacies of Shabbat and nidah reflect the pinnacle of a person’s encounter with God? This podcast surverys several approaches to learning Gemara within the world of the Yeshiva and discuss how each interprets and fulfills the spiritual aspirations of Talmud study.
Talmud Study as a Religious Practice
Talmud Study as a Religious Practice
Talmud study poses formidable challenges: the Talmud is a difficult and complex text, its modes of argumentation can appear foreign or artificial, much of its subject matter can seem dissonant with or distant from the realities of our lives. This lecture focuses on some of the more challenging aspects of the Talmud and discuss how these very attributes can contribute to the religious formation of the student of Talmud.
Living with Mental Illness: From Where Does My Help Come?
Living with Mental Illness: From Where Does My Help Come?
An exploration of Jewish resources, textual, ritual, and communal, that are available to those living with mental illness, their family members, and their friends, followed by an open discussion about the role and responsibility of community.
Prayer and Human Needs: R. Soloveitchik and Other Recent Thinkers
Prayer and Human Needs: R. Soloveitchik and Other Recent Thinkers
In praying for ourselves we become sensitized to the needs of others. What are the values that we extract from our prayers?
Words Filled with Light: Hasidic Mystical Reflections on Kavvanah and Contemplative Prayer
Words Filled with Light: Hasidic Mystical Reflections on Kavvanah and Contemplative Prayer
An analysis of meditative practices adding to the experience of prayer.
Less Ego, More God: R. Abraham Joshua Heschel in Conversation with Hasidic Masters and Christian Mystics on the Spiritual Project of Prayer
Less Ego, More God: R. Abraham Joshua Heschel in Conversation with Hasidic Masters and Christian Mystics on the Spiritual Project of Prayer
An exploration of Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel's outlook on how self-transcendence as a means of connection to God can be achieved through the values instilled by prayer.